This is an image from the video game “Two Spies.” The Catholic News Service classification is A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Entertainment Software Rating Board. (CNS photo/Royal Pixel Service’s)

NEW YORK (CNS) — The Cold War has crept into mobile gaming with Royal Pixel Service’s release of “Two Spies.” In this espionage training program, a duo of agents face off in a mock scenario across 1960s Europe and the one who uncovers the other’s location first is the winner.

The title’s board-game style, combined with atmospheric music, reminiscent of old James Bond films, makes for a unique — and incredibly fun — experience.

Rounds take place during real time, making it easy to engage in quick matches, called briefings. There are 10 maps from which to choose and there can be up to five rounds in a match.

During two-minute turns, players use a variety of actions — including moving around, taking control of a city’s intelligence network, waiting and using intel points to unlock bonuses — to track down and uncover their opponent. Skills also can be tested against an artificial-intelligence adversary with three difficulty settings. But this option is meant to be a training program only and is not as challenging as competing against another individual.

There are three ways of playing against a friend. With an internet connection, one player establishes a briefing and creates a codename. Another gamer can then join this briefing by entering the codename on his or her personal phone.

Players also can set up a briefing over local wireless. This makes it easy for two people in one household to vie against each other on their own devices.

There also is pass and play, which doesn’t require an internet connection. Instead, two gamers simply face off using one device.

Purchases can be made in-game for cosmetic add-ons only. These do not offer any gameplay benefit.

“Two Spies” tests a player’s ability to strategize and think one step ahead of a rival. Gamers of all ages are sure to enjoy this competitive exercise.

Playable on iOS devices (iPhone, iPad).

The Catholic News Service classification is A-I — general patronage. Not rated by the Entertainment Software Rating Board.

***

Smith reviews video games for Catholic News Service.